Crissi Langwell Blogs about Newport & Kibesillah Book

Nice post about Newport & Kibesillah by Book Blogger Crissi Langwell on the Press Democrat website:

http://books.blogs.pressdemocrat.com/10264/a-tale-of-two-mendocino-county-logging-towns/ 

a-tale-of-two-mendocino-county-logging-towns-

Leave a Comment

Filed under Connections

Social Media for Writers, Part II

As I mentioned in my post last week (the part about being consistent), a few months ago I was told that in order to donate a copy of  my book, Newport & Kibesillah – A Tale of Two Mendocino County Coastal Logging Towns in Northern California, to the Fort Bragg (California) Library, it needed to have to a Library of Congress number.

According to the Library of Congress website, https://www.loc.gov/publish/pcn/, a “Control Number” is a “unique identification number that the Library of Congress assigns to the catalog record created for each book in its cataloged collections.” So I applied for a control number under the local history and genealogy category, and around Christmas time, it arrived!

Of course, the Library of Congress control number was something I  have should taken care of before the book was printed but, the truth is, it never even crossed my mind. As any author knows, our pre-publication checklist is daunting.

My solution: clear mailing labels with printed with my own unique Library of Congress number, placed on the title page of each book! A bit time-consuming, but well worth it!

More soon,

Kitty

Leave a Comment

Filed under Connections

Social Media for Writers

I bought a new book at a local bookstore, Bookshop Santa Cruz, Social Media for Writers, by Tee Morris and Pip Ballantine. In it, I learned, not for the first time, that my blog posts need to be consistent! This I have not been. So my goal for this month is to be a regular blog poster. Postess? Postette? Post-placer? Blogger.

I have learned quite a few new things since writing my book, Newport & Kibesillah – A Tale of Two Mendocino County Coastal Logging Towns in Northern California. For example, when I called the Fort Bragg Library to say that I wanted to donate a copy of my book, about two towns 10 miles north of Fort Bragg that explains how Union Lumber moved its operations to Fort Bragg in the 1880s, I was told that they could not accept my book donation if it did not have a Library of Congress number!

Next post: How I solved this problem…

Leave a Comment

Filed under Connections

Lumber Schooner May Sail Again

Neat article (with photos) in today’s San Jose Mercury, “Making it Shipshape – Historic schooner’s $14M restoration nearing completion,” by Denis Cuff. It’s about a lumber schooner, the C.A. Thayer, which sailed along the West Coast from 1895 to 1912. Restored by the National Park Service, the Thayer is at a shipyard in Alameda, but will return to the Hyde Street Pier in San Francisco in 2016. 

Here’s a link to the article:
http://sanjosemercurynews.ca.newsmemory.com/publink.php?shareid=1fafd51bf

 

Lumber schooners called at the ports all along the Mendocino Coast:

“Until 1886, schooners made regular stops at Newport, Kibesillah and all the North Coast logging towns … to transport the valuable timber products to San Francisco and other ports… ++ 

“A regular feature in the Mendocino Beacon was the “Marine Intelligence” column, which listed arrivals and departures of ships, often with a list of cargo and passengers. In the October 1877, the schooners Joseph, with Capt. Ingerson at the helm, and Fanny Hyde, under the command of Capt. Jackson, both sailed from Newport to San Francisco with 2,500 and 3,200 sacks of potatoes, respectively. +++ 

“Besides potatoes, redwood and redwood byproducts from the mighty redwoods were the primary cargo shipped from the chutes at Newport and Kibesillah, from lumber and railroad ties to tan bark and cords of wood. The sailing ships carried it all:

“Schooner General Ord, Captain Gorden, for San Francisco with 105 ft. lumber and 8 cords picket bolts… Schooner Fannie A. Hyde, Captain Jesperson, for San Francisco with 2,100 sacks potatoes and 25 cords of wood…” ++++ 

 

San Jose Mercury News, October 15, 2015, page 1, by Denis Cuff

++  Newport & Kibesillah — A Tale of Two Mendocino County Coastal Logging Towns in Northern California, page 84   © 2015 Kathleen M. Nevin

+++  Mendocino Beacon, October 13, 1877

++++  Mendocino Beacon, November 10, 1877

Leave a Comment

Filed under Connections

Evenings in Newport & Kibesillah

I’ve been enjoying the Facebook posts from innkeepers Creighton & Cindy at The Inn at Newport Ranch, on the site of the one-time shipping point at  Newport, and its neighboring town, Kibesillah.

From last Saturday night (October 15, 2015):

“Dinner at the Inn tonight…15 in-house guests having crab legs & sirloin tonight…oddly very warm out tonight- should be a nice evening!”

https://www.facebook.com/The-Inn-at-Newport-Ranch-773727155999218/

It reminded me of a story about a “Grand Ball” at the end of 1877, reported in the Mendocino Beacon++, and recounted on Page 126 in my book+:

“A Grand Ball was given by Mr. Loyd Beall at the opening of his new house on Friday the 21st instant+++ near Kibesillah, at which a majority of the Kibesillahians put in an appearance. All enjoyed themselves greatly and when the hour for parting arrived all seemed loath to depart, yea even the leaders of a four horse team which brought down the Kibesillah Star Band would not think of going, and at last had to be fastened back to the wagon and pulled along.”

+ Newport & Kibesillah — A Tale of Two Mendocino County Coastal Logging Towns in Northern California

++ Mendocino Beacon, December 29, 1877

+++  The 21sth “instant,” common term used in newspapers and written communications in the 1880s. It means “in the current month.” “Proximo refers to the next month, and “ultimo” references the month preceding the current month. www.dictionary.reference.com

Leave a Comment

Filed under Connections